Cricketer Ricky Ponting Biography, Profile, Resident Address, Phone Number

Cricketer Ricky Ponting is an international cricketer and player who play for Australian cricket team. Ricky Ponting is a Right arm medium bowler and is a Right-handed batsman. Ricky Ponting home / house or resident address, height, contact number, weight, body statistics, bio data, email id and official website is given below with the necessary information of Ricky Ponting like Facebook, Twitter, Google+ page, Instagram and other related social profile and pages or links.

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Cricketer Ricky Ponting Contact Information

Below, the fans can get all necessary information related to Ricky Ponting social profile, biography, personal information, and careers, bowling and batting style, etc. Here, the fans of Cricketer Ricky Ponting can also find free HD wallpapers of Ricky Ponting, images and pics.

Cricketer Ricky Ponting Personal Life Information:

  • Ricky Ponting Date of Birth: 19th of December 1974
  • Ricky Ponting Birth Place: Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
  • Ricky Ponting Birth / Full Name: Ricky Thomas Ponting
  • Ricky Ponting Nicknames: Punter
  • Ricky Ponting Marital Status: Married
  • Ricky Ponting Height: 178 cm (5 ft 10 inch)
  • Ricky Ponting Zodiac Sign: Not Confirm
  • Ricky Ponting Languages Spoken: English and Local Language

Cricketer Ricky Ponting Careers and Information

  • Ricky Ponting Batting Style: Right-handed batsman
  • Ricky Ponting Bowling Style: Right arm medium
  • Ricky Ponting Role as: Batsman
  • Ricky Ponting Test Match Debut: 8 December 1995 v Sri Lanka
  • Ricky Ponting ODI Match Debut: 15 February 1995 v South Africa
  • Ricky Ponting Shirt Number: 14
  • Ricky Ponting T20I Match Debut: Not Confirm

Cricketer Ricky Ponting Family Information and Members:

  • Ricky Ponting Father Name: Graeme Ponting
  • Ricky Ponting Mother Name: Lorraine Ponting
  • Ricky Ponting Spouse Name: Rianna Jennifer Cantor

Cricketer Ricky Ponting Social Page Links:

  • Ricky Ponting Facebook Profile Links: Click Here
  • Ricky Ponting Twitter Profile Links: N/A
  • Ricky Ponting Google+ Link Page: N/A
  • Ricky Ponting Instagram Profile Links: N/A

Cricketer Ricky Ponting Photos, Images and Wallpapers:

Cricketer Ricky Ponting

3 Comments

  1. Hi Ricky,
    I am a 69 year-old cricket fan, and have loved the coverage and commentary of the Big Bash League presently being contested. I have loved the Hurricanes performance; they [and you] have done Tasmania proud. Keep up the great work.

    The reason for my note to you [hope you are able to access it] is as follows: There is one behavior by almost all batters which really annoys me, and it is this. When the new batter arrives at the batting crease, he looks at the stumps, and attempts to line up with the stumps at the bowlers end and proceeds to drag his spikes vigorously across the painted crease line in what he thinks is in line with his middle stump.
    This annoys me because I’m sure the ground staff have in every match on every ground, gone to great pains to prepare a wicket that is as close to perfect as they can make it; only to have a groove cut into the grass right on the crease line.
    I know bowlers past and present have targeted this mark, sometimes to the bowler’s advantage.
    My solution to this behavior is to paint 3 short [100mm] white lines across the crease line, exactly in line with the batters stumps. The lines would be correctly positioned by ground staff at the same time as other pitch markings are painted on the wicket.
    This would obviate the bad practice of having batters attempting to ascertain [when they face the bowler] just where their stumps are located, and would benefit batsmen and viewers, at the grandstands and on TV.
    Once the 3 short lines have been painted across the crease line, I would then have officials be given the power to impose a good sized fine on any batter damaging the pitch by dragging his spikes across the crease line.
    Please give me your opinion in your reply to my email address shown below. And if you decide my suggestion has some merit, perhaps you could pass it on to the officials in cricket administration with the hope they may view it favorably and even implement it sometime in the future.
    The purple “Wide” markers at each extremity of the batting crease work really well and make it much easier for the umpire at the bowlers end to decide if a ball is bowled wide.
    Let me know your opinion.
    Thanks
    Graham Wolfe
    HOWRAH

  2. Graham Wolfe January 23, 2018 at 9:16 am

    Hi Ricky,
    I am a 69 year-old cricket fan, and have loved the coverage and commentary of the Big Bash League presently being contested. I have loved the Hurricanes performance; they [and you] have done Tasmania proud. Keep up the great work.

    The reason for my note to you [hope you are able to access it] is as follows: There is one behavior by almost all batters which really annoys me, and it is this. When the new batter arrives at the batting crease, he looks at the stumps, and attempts to line up with the stumps at the bowlers end and proceeds to drag his spikes vigorously across the painted crease line in what he thinks is in line with his middle stump.
    This annoys me because I’m sure the ground staff have in every match on every ground, gone to great pains to prepare a wicket that is as close to perfect as they can make it; only to have a groove cut into the grass right on the crease line.
    I know bowlers past and present have targeted this mark, sometimes to the bowler’s advantage.
    My solution to this behavior is to paint 3 short [100mm] white lines across the crease line, exactly in line with the batters stumps. The lines would be correctly positioned by ground staff at the same time as other pitch markings are painted on the wicket.
    This would obviate the bad practice of having batters attempting to ascertain [when they face the bowler] just where their stumps are located, and would benefit batsmen and viewers, at the grandstands and on TV.
    Once the 3 short lines have been painted across the crease line, I would then have officials be given the power to impose a good sized fine on any batter damaging the pitch by dragging his spikes across the crease line.
    Please give me your opinion in your reply to my email address shown below. And if you decide my suggestion has some merit, perhaps you could pass it on to the officials in cricket administration with the hope they may view it favorably and even implement it sometime in the future.
    The purple “Wide” markers at each extremity of the batting crease work really well and make it much easier for the umpire at the bowlers end to decide if a ball is bowled wide.
    Let me know your opinion.
    Thanks
    Graham Wolfe
    HOWRAH

    Reply

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